Sunday, 5 May 2019

Questionnaire with Kirthi Jayakumar

So this month's featuring Author is 



" Kirthi Jayakumar"

       
   Can you tell us a little about yourself? Your profession and your hobbies!!
I was born in Bangalore, and grew up between my grandparents' home in Bangalore and with my mum, dad and brother in Chennai. I grew up with stars in my eyes, hoping to do medicine in the hope of "helping people", until I realised that I could do that with development, too. I studied Law in Chennai, mostly out of the fact that my father is a lawyer and if I failed in a career in development, I could still fall back on my father's practice. Once I left law school, I began working - I tried my hand out at the corporate sector and at litigation - they were all wonderful people doing some great work, but something about the system had me running out, kicking and screaming. It got me thinking that many cases that sat warming the benches in the judiciary could have been addressed had the people involved been aware of their rights at the inception. That led me to start volunteering with the UN Online Volunteering System and a couple of organizations in Chennai. To put money in the bank (because it did, at that age, irk me that my peers were earning and I wanted to save the world without a pie to my credit), began freelancing with a bunch of local publications and a bunch of legal journals and publishing initiatives. With time, I gained some understanding of the way things worked, and realised that one of the most common narratives in the journey remained tied to the gender quotient. If I worked with communities on awareness on their Right to Public Health, I noticed that women were kept out of it. If I worked with communities on their right to clean water, I noticed that women had little to no access. Similarly, for food, education, health care, infrastructure, jobs and what have you. That was when it hit me: there's so much sitting on one domino: gender inequality. If we knocked it, this enormously global burden of inequality could just, just be knocked out.      

 Questionnaire with Kirthi Jayakumar 


1. How did you first get involved in with writing, are you an imaginative person?
I think I got into writing when I was rather young - I don’t quite remember a single point in time that I “began” - but just remember, rather, always writing something or the other. I was an idealist as a child, I used to dream of a world where we would all sing songs together and eat muffins (food of choice then, haha!) and just be together without fighting. I try to hold onto that little girl's ideas even today, so definitely, yes, I am imaginative!    

2.  What do you find most challenging about your writing?
Taking myself seriously. I am most amused by myself trying to be all important.    

3. What do you do when you are not writing?
I suppose I’m always writing something or the other. So if not writing for fun, then writing for work, or writing for my peace of mind.

4. Where do you see yourself in the next 6 months, and 5 years down the road?
Doing new things, meeting new people, travelling to new places: just not the same person I am today!

5.How do you keep coming up with material / content for your story?
I don’t have a conscious process. I am an instinctive and reactionary writer - so it’s oftentimes a case of what I feel interested in writing that drives me to write. That said, once I begin writing, there is always room for research.

6. Any specific tips you have for new writers who want to make it big in the world of published books?
It’s important to remember that writing is actually truly more important than the marketing side: even though people do suggest otherwise, your truest readers reach out to books that are not aggressively marketed.

7.   What’s the best thing a writer can give to his readers?
A beautiful story.                                            

8. A lot of people are interested in writing for the money earning potential. What are some tips for people interesting in making money from writing? What are some realistic expectations in regards to what can be made?
This is a good question. I haven’t figured out an answer for it myself, though. Realistic expectations, however, are all I can offer. Always remember that there are people who will not like your writing. Take critique, don’t worry about criticism. 

9.  What motivates you most in life?
Every thing I come in contact with! Most everyone and everything has a story.

10. What is the story behind the name of your book?
I think it wrote itself out - The Doodler of Dimashq was a story of a doodler in Damascus J

11. What are your views on increasing plagiarism?
It is disheartening and hurtful, and really hurts a writer - of course I’m opposed to it!

Sunday, 28 April 2019

Mask On

Mask On




My smile hides my tears.., laugh hides my screams.
It's been this way for years.., things aren't as they seem.

 Though I always seem so happy.., With not a care in the world.
But you should know, sadly there are many things go untold.

Nobody really knows me.., they only know my outer cover.
But I wish I could let it free.., let them know what's under.

Although, I practice…,my smiles in the mirror.
Then the next thing I do is…, make my fake laugh clearer.

What is wrong? You need help…? you want to talk..? Is all they will ask..,
So I have decided…, To live with the mask on.

My smile hides my tears.., laugh hides my screams.
It's been this way for years.., things aren't as they seem.

Deep


Sunday, 21 April 2019

A Questionnaire with Deepti Menon

So this month's featuring Author is 

" Deepti Menon"


Can you tell us a little about yourself? Your profession and
your hobbies!!



One of the advantages of being a writer is that one’s hobbies and profession come together in a harmonious blend. I wrote my first poem when I was ten, and words have always fascinated me. I was an Army brat and later, I married an Army officer. Right through our sojourn in the Army, in the midst of picturesque locales, I continued my writing, and my teaching.


 Questionnaire with Deepti Menon 


1.     How did you first get involved in with writing, are you an imaginative person?
Well, I was ten when I first began writing. Even in school, I loved taking part in literary competitions. I found that I loved to juggle with words. In fact, I used to terrorize my sisters and cousins by narrating scary stories to them in dark rooms.
  As to your second question, I often let my imagination run riot, and there are times when I need to rein in my imagination when it goes way off track. J

2.     What do you find most challenging about your writing?
The biggest challenge when I write is to ensure that I speak to my readers. I write and rewrite, polishing my words till they sparkle and fall into the right spaces. What does not interest me will not interest those who read me. Hence, I find it a constant challenge to keep my words interesting.

3.     What do you do when you are not writing?
I read, I listen to music, I travel and I enjoy life! I also love spending time with my family, especially with my three-year-old granddaughter, Zoya.

4.     Where do you see yourself in the next 6 months, and 5 years down the road?
In the next six months, I hope to start the process of bringing out three books, two of which have been sent for approval to a couple of publishers, and the third an anthology of my short stories which I need to send at the end of the month. Fingers crossed with all my literary babies!
Five years down the line? Does anyone know where they will be after five years? I do hope that I will be a well-known writer whose name is on the lips of readers who speak of my writing kindly.

5.     How do you keep coming up with material / content for your story?
As I mentioned earlier, I have an imagination that tends to run riot. I can find material anywhere – while on a walk in the garden, from a snippet of conversation, the movie hall or the newspaper. My friends and family are mortally scared of saying anything to me, for they know that I will put it in my next story. J

6.     Any specific tips you have for new writers who want to make it big in the world of published books?
The one vital tip that I would like to offer to new writers is to keep writing and not be worried about rejection. When writing for a particular magazine or website, take the trouble to do your homework and make yourself familiar with the kind of writing they are looking for. Finally, when you get down to the actual writing, edit and embellish till your article is perfect. Editing is as important as writing... it gives it its lustre. Never let your standard drop.

7.     What’s the best thing a writer can give to his readers?
If a writer can touch the heart of his or her readers, and capture their attention and imagination, taking their minds away from the stress and strain of their daily lives, that, I believe, would be the best gift.

8.     A lot of people are interested in writing for the money earning potential. What are some tips for people interesting in making money from writing? What are some realistic expectations in regards to what can be made?
There are a number of writers who make loads of money from their books, and these writers are on top of the echelon. However, the same cannot be said for all writers, however good they are. So, if a writer reaches that level, it is wonderful. If not, it is better to be ‘content’ with the fact that one is writing meaningful ‘content’.

9.     What motivates you most in life?
There are many things which motivate me in life... my home library, my job that keeps me young in the company of children, my love of music and theatre and spending time with my family. However, what keeps me most motivated is the realisation that whatever I write has the power to influence my readers, in one way or the other.
10.                        The majority of the readers tend to take sides due religion and such other considerations.
I feel that religion is an intensely personal issue and taking sides in the name of religion is like touching an electric switch with wet hands. Why risk getting electrocuted? I adore Lord Ganesha, but I would not insist that everyone around me does so as well. The motto of my school, Hari Sri Vidya Nidhi, resonates within my heart as well. “Let the Peal of Harmony be the Appeal of all Religions.”

11.     What is the story behind the name of your book?
The title of my book is ‘Shadow in the Mirror’, a book that was brought out by Readomania in 2016. The cover image has the face of a mysterious lady in blue with a striking red bindi. The mirror does not lie and often, esoteric truths lie behind the shadows within mirrors; tales within tales collude and collide, as do the lives of those living within the tales.  

12.      What are your views on increasing plagiarism?
If there is a reprehensible crime in the world of writing and literature, it is that of plagiarism. How can a writer forgive another for robbing him of his greatest wealth – his writing and his ideas? Unfortunately, piracy is also on the rise and many popular authors lose out because their books are sold on pavements at a quarter of their actual prices. Unless the laws on plagiarism and piracy are made stringent, these crimes against authors will continue. 





Thank you so much, Dipali, for these interesting questions. God bless!




Friday, 22 March 2019

Food with lots of love-Premji Rasoi-Hydreabad


One of the many vegetarian restaurants around Abids that serves very good food at a reasonable price. During my visit to Hyderabad, one of my friends suggests this place. So on one of the weekend, we ended up going to the restaurant. The ambience is good to have a quite lunch or dinner. I visited this place along with my friends and ordered monchow soup, salt and pepper corn in starters and paneer masala, butter naan
and handi dal everything was awesome, curry was delicious with butter naan. Prices are reasonable. Dining area is an upscale place on first floor .restaurant offers quick service and nice maintenance.Management is friendly and the food is delicious. I and my friends reached the restaurant in about 45mins we ordered soups, 1 starters, 2
curries, naan and rice. Everything was delicious and liked by all.Overall good place for dinner and if you are looking north Indian food then this hotel you should check out. Nice and good place for family
and friends.

Food : 5/5
Ambiance : 5/5
Service 5/5
Value for money : 5/5












Monday, 11 March 2019

Not Just Pan-Dimmy's Pan





Dimmy's Pan Palace is no more only a pan palace but has turned into a small eatery. Although they are still famous for pan. During my official tour to Hyderabad I went thereafter became a regular visitor. I tries almost all the flavour pans. they have excellent Ice pan which is must try. The chat and snacks are add-ons but this place is known for pans in the city. Ice cream pan is also a good option and one can have the pan after the dinner. if you are in Hyderabad and  want to have lip smacking pan? If yes then this is the place to visit. Prices are pocket friendly and great pan for your palate. The Best thing is here they take cards and paytm payment also. This is a must visit place for all the "pan" fans in city! I have gone with all of my friends over here.And everyone really liked pan over here. They have so many varieties of pan. But, the 'Calcutta Meenakshi Masala' is the best seller and my personal favourite. I have tried the flavoured Meenakshi pans as well (green apple, cranberry etc.) I missed to have chocolate pan as it was not available during my visits.But all and all, it's a must visit place for people who enjoy eating pans.

Food - 5/5
Service -4/5
Ambience -4/5
Value for money -5/5